‘Yoga practice helps us to adapt to change’

Travel tips are starting to fill our inbox well ahead of our December Yatra to south India.

The big, eye-opening one thus far has been: fast during the trip to avoid jet lag and help ensure we’ll start sleeping through the night right away. It might be awful as we do it, but we’ll be glad when the rest of the Yatra group are zombies and we’re happy, refreshed little daisies. (I’m paraphrasing.)

This week, Tim Miller — just back from Europe — offers a slightly less aggressive means of dealing with long travel in his latest Tuesdays with Timji:

Enduring only slight delays during our Mercury retrograde travel experience, we made it home late last night after our 24 hour journey from Copenhagen. I managed a couple of hours sleep on the last leg of the journey from New York to San Diego, and maybe two more before my alarm went off at 4:30 this morning. … I find the practice of pranayama particularly helpful with jet lag, or “vata derangement,”as it would be called from the ayurvedic perspective. Yoga practice, quite simply, helps us to adapt to change.

That certainly is a less extreme measure. (We’re open to more travel hints, by the way.)

Tim then discusses the dual nature of the universe, as represented by the nakshatra in which today’s new moon is happening. It leads to a reminder or Rama, whose life wasa influenced by this nakshatra, Punarvasu. But you’ll have to check Tim’s blog to get that; he’s the expert.

I will grab one more quote from him, though: “Nonetheless, I am looking forward to a yoga holiday tomorrow in honor of the new moon.” We are absolutely enjoying this day off, too. For me, the extra 90 minutes of sleep is a big blessing. And, as I expected, the slight alteration to the practice yesterday has left its mark. I will be trying to rest as much as possible today, although the fact it involves a commute into downtown Los Angeles may counteract all my efforts.

Posted by Steve

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theconfluencecountdown

Two Ashtangis write about their practice and their teachers.

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