Mercury day poetry: Rimbaud’s ‘Dawn’

For reasons I hope are extremely obvious, this poem seemed fitting to our little Ashtanga corner of the yoga world. Arthur Rimbaud’s “Dawn”:

I have kissed the summer dawn. Before the palaces, nothing moved. The water lay dead. Battalions of shadows still kept the forest road.

I walked, walking warm and vital breath, While stones watched, and wings rose soundlessly.

My first adventure, in a path already gleaming With a clear pale light, Was a flower who told me its name.

I laughted at the blond Wasserfall That threw its hair across the pines: On the silvered summit, I came upon the goddess.

Then one by one, I lifted her veils. In the long walk, waving my arms.

Across the meadow, where I betrayed her to the cock. In the heart of town she fled among the steeples and domes, And I hunted her, scrambling like a beggar on marble wharves.

Above the road, near a thicket of laurel, I caught her in her gathered veils, And smelled the scent of her immense body. Dawn and the child fell together at the bottom of the wood.

When I awoke, it was noon.

That’s what can happen if you nod off during savasana.

Posted by Steve

 

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theconfluencecountdown

Two Ashtangis write about their practice and their teachers.

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