Smithsonian yoga exhibit beats its crowdsourcing goal, nets $170,000

I guess people like this yoga thing.

The people behind the fall exhibit on art and yoga at the Smithsonian’s Freer and Sackler galleries far exceeded their crowdsourcing goal of $125,000 — topping out at $170,000. There were more than 600 donors, including Whole Foods — which dropped $70,000 (and thus has gotten some nice press, including here). Sounds like the money will go toward all the shipping of different pieces, which are being brought in from private collections around the world.

I’d say you can expect to see similar efforts by museums — especially publicly funded ones — in the future.

We’ve written about this exhibit a few times — going back into last year.

Here’s a reminder of what the exhibit is about:

Yoga is more than you know.
Yoga is a global phenomenon practiced by millions of people seeking spiritual insight and better health. Few, however, are aware of yoga’s dynamic history. Opening this fall at the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery is Yoga: The Art of Transformation, the world’s first exhibition of yogic art. Temple sculptures, devotional icons, vibrant manuscripts, and court paintings created in India over 2000 years—as well as early modern photographs, books, and films—reveal yoga’s mysteries and illuminate its profound meanings.

There’s this piece, in particular, that sounds worth a trip to DC: “ten folios from the first illustrated compilation of asanas (yogic postures), made for a Mughal emperor in 1602, which have never before been exhibited together.”

It runs Oct. 19 to Jan. 26.

Posted by Steve 

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theconfluencecountdown

Two Ashtangis write about their practice and their teachers.

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