Yogi diet: At last, we know what ‘gluten-free’ means

The title, before anyone writes anything, is a joke. Of course we know what “gluten-free” means. It’s just that the U.S. government didn’t, before now:

People with celiac disease can now have confidence in the meaning of a “gluten-free” label on foods.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a final rule that defines what characteristics a food has to have to bear a label that proclaims it “gluten- free.” The rule also holds foods labeled “without gluten,” “free of gluten,” and “no gluten” to the same standard.

This rule has been eagerly awaited by advocates for people with celiac disease, who face potentially life-threatening illnesses if they eat the gluten found in breads, cakes, cereals, pastas and many other foods.

As one of the criteria for using the claim “gluten-free,” FDA is setting a gluten limit of less than 20 ppm (parts per million) in foods that carry this label. This is the lowest level that can be consistently detected in foods using valid scientific analytical tools. Also, most people with celiac disease can tolerate foods with very small amounts of gluten. This level is consistent with those set by other countries and international bodies that set food safety standards.

The FDA released that last Friday. So now you know.

If you look over to the side of this blog, you’ll see our “Yogi diet” includes no wheat. It isn’t because either of us has celiac disease; it’s just that we’ve found we feel better, keep a more regulated weight (no wheat belly) and don’t get various sugar highs and lows when we aren’t eating wheat. All of that is caused by a change in modern wheat’s amino acids.

I haven’t seen anything that tried to link that change to the rise in celiac disease. In a lot of ways, the no-wheat thing when not attached to gluten-free is still sort of “out there.” (And it’s a bummer when you think about dosas or naan.) It’s our greatest nod to that vast changes that a yoga routine can cause (or the havoc it can wreck). But it is one we can’t but embrace.

And, to be clear: This FDA pronouncement doesn’t change things at all for us. We avoid gluten-free products like the plague because they are processed.

Posted by Steve

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theconfluencecountdown

Two Ashtangis write about their practice and their teachers.

4 thoughts on “Yogi diet: At last, we know what ‘gluten-free’ means”

  1. I read somewhere years ago (maybe in Diet For A New America or Diet For A New Planet) that 75% of the population has low level wheat allergies. Wheat and corn were used to feed the populaces at mass there was no regard for health just keep the peasants full, alive and collect money as tax from them. We seem to have kept feudal ways alive to this day. We should eat like first nations people pre contact i.e. horse and gun.

    NATIVE AMERICANS AND VEGETARIANISM
    http://www.ivu.org/history/native_americans.html

    1. I know the traditional is with rice and lentil, but it sure seems like ones in the U.S. add wheat in there. Looking around a little (to try to figure this out) there seems to be versions of both. I suppose maybe one could ask… and maybe I just got an argument to have more dosas. 🙂

      S

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