Do your practice, every day, doesn’t apply just to Ashtanga

I know there was some consternation last week about Nancy Gilgoff’s defining an Ashtanga practitioner as someone who does the practice six days a week, every week, taking only Moon Days off.

It does sound a bit harsh, I guess, with not much room for failing to meet those proscribed definitions. (Elsewhere, I think, three days a week is the minimum “requirement” for an Ashtanga practice.)

Of course, I’d point out, Nancy also says practice doesn’t have to be in the morning (and the day off doesn’t have to be Saturday), so on some other fronts she might not meet some people’s Ashtanga yardstick.

More so, though, I think it is worth considering why there’s a focus on a continued, dedicated practice. And I turn to Krishna Das.

Here’s a link to a video of him at Yoga International (which I can’t get to embed). And here’s the accompanying text:

The one thing we have to do is some kind of practice every day. Even as little as 5 minutes of practice a day can be life changing over time. It opens our hearts and awareness from within, allowing us to let go of superficial things and rest more easily in ourselves. It’s the only way to know anything that really matters—the only way to get to shore as we find ourselves headed for the rapids. A teacher can point the way, but we have to do the practice.

Food for thought. And it sort of goes with David Garrigues’ thoughts on a teacher motivating students.

Posted by Steve

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theconfluencecountdown

Two Ashtangis write about their practice and their teachers.

One thought on “Do your practice, every day, doesn’t apply just to Ashtanga”

  1. I don’t fuss too much about other people’s definitions of what makes an ashtangi, it’s more relevant how you identify yourself. Certainly the ideal is a six day a week physical practice, with the prescribed days off, but ashtanga consists of eight limbs, asana being only one of those. But hey, what do I know?! 🙂

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