Prepare to “get real” — and maybe to get Third Series

A few things from out of the Ashtanga Yoga Center.

First off, we’re hearing that people are beginning to hear about the Third Series Teacher Training that Tim Miller plans to run next summer. So watch your emails, if you’re waiting. (And, I think, don’t freak out if you haven’t heard anything yet.)

And it turns out that his timing for that training might be interesting. From Tim’s latest blog post:

It is always significant when Saturn changes signs since it happens so infrequently, only once every 2.5 years or so in its 30- year transit of the twelve houses of the zodiac. It is interesting that Saturn’s entry into Scorpio happened on the “Day of the Dead” because they each have associations with death. Both Scorpio and Saturn are karmic in their structure and impact on human life, and so the events to come in the next three years will indicate the state of fruition of our Karma in this life. Prepare to “get real”.

[snip]

In my experience, the best way to combine the energies of Mars and Saturn is through the practice of yoga. Mars provides us with the energy to practice, and Saturn gives us the self-discipline to stick with it: Mars gives us some fire to create tapas, while Saturn regulates our expenditure of energy so we don’t burn ourselves out. In Patanjali’s brief description of the practice of Asana he says: II.46 Sthira sukham asanam—“Posture is both firm and soft”—and: II.47 Prayatna saitilyam ananta samapattibhyam—“By balancing effort and surrender we become absorbed in the infinite”. In these two sutras, Patanjali describes asana as a balancing of opposing yet complimentary forces. When we become proficient at doing this, Patanjali suggests that: II.48 Tatah dvandva anabhighatah—“Then we are undisturbed by duality.” Saturn’s transit of Scorpio will be an excellent opportunity for us to practice this stuff.

You don’t have to wait until next summer.

Posted by Steve

Advertisements

Published by

theconfluencecountdown

Two Ashtangis write about their practice and their teachers.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s