Does this count as an answer to the student who says yoga hurt her?

Yesterday, we passed on news that an eighth-grader in Encinitas this week went before the school board to ask that they halt the district’s Sonima Foundation-backed yoga program. As reported by the U-T San Diego:

She and her parents told the U-T that she participated in a variety of yoga warm up and stretching exercises over five months that caused the cartilage tear.

“I spent a number of nights crying,” said Katie, who played soccer and basketball and was nearly a black belt in karate before the injury.

Coincidentally enough, on Tuesday the Sonima Foundation blog highlighted what certainly seems to be an unintended counter argument:

Last week, I had a 5th grade student come up to me at the end of class and tell me how he has been using belly breathing to keep himself calm. He went on to say that when he has to pitch at an important baseball game, he gets really nervous. To help himself calm down and stay focused, he does belly breathing while he is in the dugout and even on the field before each pitch. His mother has noticed he seems calmer and more focused during the game! He also admitted to me that at first, he didn’t like yoga exercise and thought that it was a waste of his time. Now, he understands how the stretching helps him prevent injuries and the breathing helps him stay calm.

Two sides to one yoga coin, huh? As one of our readers pointed out, maybe the girl’s injuries had to do with basketball or soccer, or even karate, rather than yoga. (That’s speculation — but the story doesn’t provide an irrefutable argument about how the family knows it was yoga that caused the injuries.)

I think about the only thing sure here is that, like how the trial is pitting “expert” against “expert”, we probably could line up students who are both “for” and “against” the program.

Posted by Steve

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theconfluencecountdown

Two Ashtangis write about their practice and their teachers.

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