What’s Third Series Done for Me Lately?

Tim teaching, Guruji looking over his shoulder.
Tim teaching, Guruji looking over his shoulder.

Years ago when I took Tim Miller’s First and Second Series teacher trainings here in Encinitas, my favorite part of the discussion of the poses was the moment when we focused on the specific benefits of each asana. In First Series, Tim would also read from Pattabhi Jois’s Yoga Mala, where Guruji carefully describes benefits, which seem to often involve the…ahem…anus. In Second, things were more anatomy-oriented, and we often focused on the subtle body as well.

Tim set up Third Series by describing its place in context with the other two. First is of course yoga chikitsa—“yoga therapy”—chiefly for the digestive track. Its focus is on the hip joints, and opening up the back of the body. Also, getting rid of excess upana. Frankly, “bad fat.” Tim called it “cleaning the plumbing.”

If First is the plumbing, he said, “Second is for the electrical system.” Nadi shodhana is of course, nadi cleansing. It frees the flow of prana in the body. Tim pointed out you get “periodic tests for lightness” in Second.

Third—sthira bhaga: “divine stability”—is for “stabilizing that awakened energy.”

So my ears perked up as we started to go through the poses. I was waiting for descriptions of each asana‘s benefit, how it fits into this divine stability. “The benefits are collective,” Tim told us. “Make some up.” So, I thought I would. Here goes.

If the benefits of Third overall are to bring all the elements of an Ashtanga asana practice together (namely, strength, balance, flexibility) into a practice of stability, and if stability comes from the mental focus required in Third, then there must be some subtle and maybe not-so-subtle distinctions among the poses of the Series.

It seems to me that the high attention that the practitioner has to pay to the sense of the body in space (it requires “highly advanced propriaperception,” Tim pointed out), then the movement from side to side, finding a variety of ways to use the body as a weighted balance, is different as Third Series goes along.

It may be that I’m focusing on this because of the way I learned Third. Which was exactly like the way I learned Second: As a series, entire; not pose-by-pose with long spaces of time in between. But it feels to me like:

We begin with the lateral body, strengthening the hips but also increasing the range of motion in them. Bandhas are a prerequisite, but we’re not just using them for their own sake now (as we might just to breathe correctly in First). You must use them to strengthen muscles in the lateral body. The leg goes behind you, one side at a time, over and over. These movements require strength, a successive opening in rarely accessed muscle groups, and also involve the neck, cervical vertebrae, lower back muscles in resistance, and the feet.

Then in the lifts your years of lotus pay off! But its quality is different. It’s a working lotus. We also develop greater range of motion and strength in the wrists, and all of the core muscles must work at the same time—that is, the back and front of the torso—to do those poses. Even the muscles of the fingers work here.

Then the shoulders (which gain great strength in the difficult to access rotator cuff muscles, by the way) and hip flexors in arm balances that draw on this lateral strength; swinging the legs in space, the quadriceps working in harmony with hamstrings, and the hands, which must grip the floor firmly and evenly.

There’s some radical twisting and folding next. While most of us are just happy to sit down finally, the extremity of these poses seem to point to a need to take an already flexible and strong practitioner into some twists and folds that will find all those spaces you haven’t yet twisted—in the back, hips, shoulders, and feet—and twist them now again.

Hamstrings feeling tight? The series then sends the practitioner into a set of poses that by themselves aren’t hard at all, but they come in the back third, so to speak, of Third, so they seems so much more difficult than they would be out of context. Hello, humility! But also opening, extending, unfolding of a lot of muscle groups that have been pretty bound up, and a whole new way to access stability muscles as we stand–utterly fatigued–on one leg.

Which of course gets you ready for that beautiful back bending sequence of Third, which somehow brings together all the strength and agility required up to this point into play: Balance, strength in the actual supporting muscles of the back of the body: You can’t just surrender to these backbends. Here is where you realize that “back bends” are misnamed. They are back extensions.

So this is the story of Third I tell myself, and I told Tim that while I sometimes can’t even execute the state of the pose in some cases, and often have to modify or approximate the pose, I still find great benefit in the attempt. As I get older, I will need all the strength and stability I can find in my body, and in my mind. The arthritis in my hands and feet benefit. My hips benefit. The torn labrum in my shoulder is an afterthought now. But to me that mind part is the most important benefit of Third. Wake up! I tell myself when I roll the mat out. The more awake we are, the better.

Posted by Bobbie

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theconfluencecountdown

Two Ashtangis write about their practice and their teachers.

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