There’s still time to check out the Supermoon eclipse

By my calculations, not matter where you are right now, you’ve got an hour before the Supermoon eclipse begins and more than that before the full show starts. As long as you are at or west of the eastern edge of Africa, you’ll be able to see some part of it.

Here’s info from space.com:

You can watch the harvest moon lunar eclipse live in a webcast by the Slooh Community Observatory. You can also watch the total lunar eclipse on Space.com, courtesy of Slooh. The lunar eclipse will also feature the “biggest” full moon (in apparent size) of 2015, since the moon will also be at perigee on the very same day ─ its closest point to the Earth ─ 221,753 miles (356,877 km) away. [Visibility Maps for the Supermoon Lunar Eclipse (Gallery)]

The Sept. 27 event is therefore being called a “supermoon eclipse.” The last such eclipse happened in 1982, and the next won’t occur until 2033.

Out here on the West Coast, it even is happening early enough not to interfere with getting up tomorrow morning.

Posted by Steve

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theconfluencecountdown

Two Ashtangis write about their practice and their teachers.

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