What should a description of a Mysore class include?

I came across this description of a Mysore class/program at Ashtanga Montauk, which admittedly is a spot more on my radar for surfing than yoga:

Mysore Style Classes

are Ashtanga Yoga classes, as traditionally practiced in Mysore, India, the home of the late Sri K. Pattabhi Jois. The Mysore class is a group class where students have a self-paced practice, with verbal instruction and hands-on adjustments from the teacher. Because the instruction in a Mysore class is highly individualized, it is appropriate for both new students as well as more advanced practitioners. This unique combination of individualized pace and instruction within a group class gives each student the ability to work at his/her own level, while enjoying the inspiration and energy of a group. Each student is taught and supported by the teacher as he/she memorizes the sequence and develops a personal rhythm to the practice. This class is appropriate for students of all levels and is an excellent opportunity to develop a practice that can slowly build over a lifetime. Knowing the sequence of postures is not required, just being open-minded, curious, and receptive to learning.

We’ve got housed on our site a link to Yoga Workshop’s briefing on Mysore. It has a nice mix of irreverence and information. This one seems to do a pretty solid job, as well. But I wonder: Is there anything you think is missing? Anything that ought to be included in any Mysore description? Something more on the asanas and how they are likely to be approached? Maybe the one thing that seems to be missing, as opposed to most, is a semi-requirement that a student commit to the first month and a certain number of days per week.

Anything else?

Posted by Steve

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theconfluencecountdown

Two Ashtangis write about their practice and their teachers.

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