A very short and different Gita

For you fans of what’s happening in the skies, a quick check-in on Tim Miller’s blog this week:

[Y]ou may have noticed that Mars and Jupiter are now very close together—for the next week they will be within one degree of each other, with an exact conjunction Saturday October 17that 3:40pmPDT. This is a high-powered transit combining the physical energy and confidence of Mars with the optimism and expansiveness of Jupiter to generate fortunate action. During this transit we tend to feel strong and fit, and more willing to take chances than usual. The conjunction of Mars and Jupiter takes place in Purvaphalguni (the first fruit of the gunas) nakshatra in the sign of Leo.

What’s that mean? Well, it could be something like this:

Under the current influence of Mars/Jupiter conjunct in Purvaphalguni this conversation might have gone differently, perhaps something like this: … “Not to worry, Krishna,” says Arjuna, “I am the greatest warrior the world has ever known—the Kauravas are toast.”

As Tim notes, that would make for an uninspiring Gita. So it’s a good week to pause for just a second before leaping.

Posted by Steve

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Tim Miller’s first public yoga demo done at ‘breakneck speed’

I’m very happy that Nigel at Ashtanga Yoga Hong Kong captured this story of Tim Miller: His first yoga demo in Mysore. I’ve heard it before, but I’m not sure Tim specified he was doing Third Series. (This, obviously, is from last month’s Third Series training so it would make sense to make that clear.)

Having seen these students doing Third — not to mention Bobbie’s doing is Sunday at home — I think it fair to say that “breakneck speed” — mentioned around the 1:30 mark — seems extremely appropriate.

Posted by Steve

Wonder what an intro to Ashtanga class with Tim Miller is like?

Wonder no more, and thanks to Nigel at Ashtanga Yoga Hong Kong for doing some of my work for me.

His latest contribution to the online world: Video of a Tim Miller Intro to Ashtanga class. Yep, the intro class Tim still teaches every week.

Make sure to listen closely for what I think of as Tim’s Guruji sounds — I, sadly, am often the target of the most disbeliving/amazed/disappointed ones.

There is some picture issues, Nigel notes. But they will go away.

Posted by Steve

It’s OK to research some poses

As promised, video is coming out from the Third Series training via Ashtanga Yoga Hong Kong. Here Tim Miller talks about research poses:

The description is nice, too:

Answering a student question about how much Research is acceptable, the answer also serves as preparation for the “awkward transition’ in Third Series that happens between the first half of the series, which is all the Leg-behind-the-head extreme forwards bends and Arm-balances, and the latter half of deep Back-bends. In other words; from Viranchasana B to Viparita Dandasana. As usual with Tim, there are some laughs along the way…

The laughs help with the research.

Posted by Steve

Video: Tim Miller adjusting in Viranchyasana A

Here’s a minute of video from the Third Series training, via our friend Maria Zavala — who is also the victim practitioner being adjusted:

As she notes, it’s a “very challenging pose.” You think?!?

I’ve heard from a few of those at the training that they will be getting videos up. We’ll keep our eyes out.

Posted by Steve

What You Do and What You Think You Can’t Do

The change into a new state of being is the result of the fullness of nature unfolding inherent potential.

Yoga Sutras IV.2 (trans. Tim Miller)

“There will be no Fourth Series Teacher Training,” Tim announced (in a definitive voice) during the first days of his Third Series training. So, now that all the trainees have completed our Third Series training, I guess we’ve maxed out.

We try pretty hard here at The Confluence Countdown to keep a more universal tone to our posts–keep it newsy and light and out of the personal. That’s pretty hard as I emerge from the self-centered hothouse that is a yoga teacher training: Ostensibly, we were supposed to be learning to teach Third Series; really, we were learning to do Third Series in the broadest possible sense of doing. That is to say, what to do with it now that we know it.

“Guruji said Third Series was ‘just circus,'” Tim told us; “tricks” the early practitioners called the phenomenal Ashtanga backbending sequence. When he would remind us of this (as he did often), I would hear Steve’s voice in my head. He’d asked me as I was preparing, struggling and sore, “Do you have a good reason to want to learn this?” (or, occasionally, “Why are you doing this?”).

At the time, I was pretty sure I had a good reason. Third Series offers me unprecedented access to the kind of structural muscle strength my degrading joints need. But now the training is done, I find myself wanting a better answer.

The collection of training manuals.
The collection of training manuals.

I probably won’t be teaching my handful of yoga students Third Series any time soon. I won’t be busting out my repertoire of fabulous asanas on Facebook or putting them on display in my local Mysore room; I practice alone. There’s no teacher’s eye to motivate me, and Tim is a hundred miles away and can’t direct that hilarious grunt of disappointment at me when I cheat. So as I forge ahead with the prescription he gave me last week–First with Second one day a week, the rest of the time, Third Series–what’s my reason for doing this?

From the seat where I’m writing this, there is a damselfly lightly hovering around the window looking out on our garden. She’s a fine thing, hardly thicker than a needle, with nearly invisible wings that seem to be made of leaf veins. As she approaches me, she encounters the invisible obstacle of a pane of glass. She taps it gently: Once, twice. Even though she can’t see that barrier, it sends her off in an unintended direction, and she’s gone.

I feel now like a version of that damselfly, save this: The invisible barriers have disappeared, and I’ve been given a chance to fly through them. I learned that possibility is a powerful tool. Certainly, barriers are there. But if you gain a finer sense of your own strength, both mental and physical, what you think you can’t do will transform into a greater understanding of what you do, and why you do it.

On the last day, we studied both the chapter in the Yoga Sutras that contains the words that lead this post, as well as the chapter from the Ramayana where Hanuman, under a curse that he must forget his extraordinary abilities until he is reminded, leaps over the ocean to Lanka to find Sita. “In a sense,” Tim said, “we all possess extraordinary abilities.” Thank you, Tim Miller, for the reminder.

Posted by Bobbie