If you aren’t already going to Mysore in 2014, you aren’t going to Mysore in 2014

There’s news at the Ashtanga Yoga Institute website that the December batch of classes are full — just four days after applications were accepted.

That means beginning October 1, you can try to apply for practice in January 2015. And — perhaps in recognition of how quickly the classes with Sharath are filling up — the website already mentions applying for February 2015 — that starts November 1.

In other words, time to start planning ahead. (As the website notes: “If you submit your form earlier, it will be automatically deleted without further notice.”)

Or maybe you’ve been practicing this week with Sharath in Los Angeles or are going to be doing so next week in New York.

Posted by Steve

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Iyengar and the dawn of modern yoga

OK, so this will, I hope, be the last link to a piece on Iyengar we post. Bobbie told me today — while, I suppose I can “boast” we climbed Runyon Canyon in LA after our regular Ashtanga practice, a thoroughly LA experience that only could be made more so had we definitely seen a celebrity or it had been January, and most of our fellow Ashtangis freezing cold in the inhospitable climes of some place like New Hampshire or Boston — that she has a post percolating about Iyengar.

This post may be in part to pressure her to write it.

Anyway, if you otherwise don’t see it, the New Yorker — and, yes, you’re forgiven if you’re surprised we’re in LA and not NYC — has a remembrance of Iyengar that situates him (and to a lesser extent Pattabhi Jois) within the creation of modern yoga. Here’s the link and a little taste:

When Iyengar was sixteen, in 1934, he was sent to live with his sister and her husband, Krishnamacharya, in Mysore, a green, temperate city not far from Bangalore. He arrived at a time of enormous ferment in the development of modern yoga. Indian nationalists were particularly taken with the global vogue for “physical culture,” in part because British domination was often justified in terms of physical superiority. As the nationalist movement gained steam and Indians turned away from foreign imports— replacing Western clothing with homespun khadi cloth, for example—nationalists found in the old hatha yoga the basis for a physical culture that was distinctly Indian. Krishnamacharya, a brilliant scholar who had sacrificed respectability to pursue the outré path of hatha yoga, was at the forefront of this renaissance. At the invitation of the progressive Maharaja of Mysore, a patron of traditional Indian arts and an avid sportsman, he ran a yoga shala at the palace, where he taught yogic physical culture to royal boys.

The piece calls Iyengar the most influence of Krishnamacharya’s students. I suppose I ought to argue that point, but I don’t think it is arguable. It also neatly sums up how hatha yoga was treated before Krishnamacharya’s effort to revive it or, perhaps we could say, revise it.

For those keeping track at home, if you read the New Yorker piece, check out the way Mark Singleton’s scholarship is couched. Pretty interesting for those in the know.

Oh, and I hope you enjoy your Moon Day.

Posted by Steve

Act fast! Too late. Mysore’s full until December already

If your Ashtanga practice is teaching you to be calm and patient, that may be working to your disadvantage.

Because the second month of this year’s practice time in Mysore already has filled up. Here are the details from the institute’s website:

Sharath’s class is full for OCTOBER and NOVEMBER 2014. We will not accept any more registration forms for this month. Online applications for December arrivals will not be accepted until September 1st. Likewise, online registration for the January 2015 batch will begin on October 1, 2014 (3 months before your start date). If you submit your form earlier, it will be automatically deleted without further notice.

It’s starting to feel like the old concert days, where you had to get up early and get in line if you wanted seats to the [fill in your favorite artist] show.

While we have your attention, just another reminder from Mysore (I don’t think anything is new here):

For students applying to study with Sharath, please note the following:
1. Students must start their practice within the first 5 days of every month (e.g. Oct 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th). If you cannot start on those dates, you should wait and apply for the next month. This also means that in-person registration at the shala will only occur between 1st to 5th of every month.
2. Students must pay by cash when they register in Mysore, and full fees are expected from the start date. Our fee structure has changed. Click here for more details.
3. We do not entertain any cancellations or change of dates, once the online registration has been submitted. Extensions of stay will also not be granted. Students may practice with Sharath for a minimum of one month and for no longer than three months.

All clear?

Posted by Steve

Here are the fees and more details for practicing this fall at Mysore

The KPJAYI Ashtanga Institute has updated information about this fall’s practice.

We’ve heard a few questions about cost this year. Here’s a link to that part, and the details:

Students must pay by cash when they register in Mysore, and full fees are expected from the start date.

For foreign students (per person), the fees for Sharath’s class are Rs. 33,708/- for the first month (Rs. 30,000 + 12.36% service tax). From the second month onwards, the fees are Rs. 22,472/- (per month) (Rs. 20,000 + 12.36% service tax). In addition, you must pay an extra Rs.500 (per month) for chanting class, which is compulsory for all students.

For those wanting to work that out, that is about $565 for that first month.

They’ve also updates the following:

1. Students must start their practice within the first 5 days of every month (e.g. Oct 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th). If you cannot start on those dates, you should wait and apply for the next month. This also means that in-person registration at the shala will only occur between 1st to 5th of every month.
2. Students must pay by cash when they register in Mysore, and full fees are expected from the start date. Our fee structure has changed. Click here for more details.
3. We do not entertain any cancellations or change of dates, once the online registration has been submitted. Extensions of stay will also not be granted. Students may practice with Sharath for a minimum of one month and for no longer than three months.

As we noted before, online registration for October starts on July 1.
Posted by Steve

Start date for next season’s Mysore announced; registration begins July 1

A tidbit of information about the 2014-15 practice season — is there a better way to describe it? — in Mysore is up at the KPJAYI website:

Sharath’s class in Mysore will begin on October 1, 2014. Online registration for the October batch will open on July 1, 2014. If you submit your form earlier, it will be automatically deleted without further notice. Further details will be announced soon.

The site also notes that Saraswati returns to teacher there on July 14.

That’s it! Happy Monday.

Posted by Steve

Updates from Mysore: They are not on Twitter or Facebook

Based on a few searches that drew people to our blog in the past 24 hours or so, folks are starting to want to plan for their trips to Mysore later this year or in 2015.

Like most good Ashtangis, you’re jumping the gun. Here’s the latest word from the Ashtanga Yoga Institute, at least according to its webpage:

Sharath is currently on a break from teaching. We will announce the future dates of his classes on our website. We are not accepting online registration for Fall 2014 or Winter 2015 yet. If you submit your form early, it will be automatically deleted. Kindly wait until the dates are confirmed.

That, though, isn’t the update that really caught my attention (although it was the reason I stopped by). It was this:

KPJAYI has not created or endorsed any Facebook page or Twitter profile. Please take note that Sharath has not given permission for use of his name or pictures for this purpose.

It doesn’t say anything about the Tubes of You, though.

Posted by Steve